New flagship range from Mullineux & Leeu Family Wines released

By Claudia | 24 March 2017

Since 2013, Andrea and Chris Mullineux have been working on a new wine project with their partner Analjit Singh and today they have just announced the release of a new flagship portfolio of wines called Leeu Passant -  a name derived from heraldry, where a “Lion Passant” is a walking lion. 
 
These multi-regional fine wines, incorporating several very special and old (up to 117 years old!) vineyards, celebrate the rich history of South African wine. Using the Cape’s wine heritage dating back to the 17th Century as inspiration, they decided to deconstruct the venerable Cape wines of the 1950’s, 1960’s and 1970’s, retain their best component parts, and then reconstruct them in a modern, minimalist way while respecting tradition.  They are carefully crafted at the Leeu Passant cellar of Mullineux & Leeu Family Wines, based on Leeu Estates in Franschhoek.
 
For many years, their viticulturist, Rosa Kruger, has been enthusing about special parcels of vines outside the Swartland; however, they couldn’t use these as the Mullineux and Kloof Street wines are exclusively from Swartland vineyards.  Leeu Passant is the culmination of a vision shared by Chris, Andrea and Analjit, to harness these exciting vineyards to create wines under a new label in a different wine region, in their Franschhoek winery, with the same attention to detail, passion, and uncompromisingly high standards that our Swartland wines are made with.
 
Three Leeu Passant wines will be available from the 3rd April, 2017. Watch this space for UK listings. 

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