New flagship range from Mullineux & Leeu Family Wines released

By Claudia | 24 March 2017

Since 2013, Andrea and Chris Mullineux have been working on a new wine project with their partner Analjit Singh and today they have just announced the release of a new flagship portfolio of wines called Leeu Passant -  a name derived from heraldry, where a “Lion Passant” is a walking lion. 
 
These multi-regional fine wines, incorporating several very special and old (up to 117 years old!) vineyards, celebrate the rich history of South African wine. Using the Cape’s wine heritage dating back to the 17th Century as inspiration, they decided to deconstruct the venerable Cape wines of the 1950’s, 1960’s and 1970’s, retain their best component parts, and then reconstruct them in a modern, minimalist way while respecting tradition.  They are carefully crafted at the Leeu Passant cellar of Mullineux & Leeu Family Wines, based on Leeu Estates in Franschhoek.
 
For many years, their viticulturist, Rosa Kruger, has been enthusing about special parcels of vines outside the Swartland; however, they couldn’t use these as the Mullineux and Kloof Street wines are exclusively from Swartland vineyards.  Leeu Passant is the culmination of a vision shared by Chris, Andrea and Analjit, to harness these exciting vineyards to create wines under a new label in a different wine region, in their Franschhoek winery, with the same attention to detail, passion, and uncompromisingly high standards that our Swartland wines are made with.
 
Three Leeu Passant wines will be available from the 3rd April, 2017. Watch this space for UK listings. 

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From Jamie Goode

Jamie Goode

The interesting thing about wine is that you only get one chance a year to make it. So for the average winemaker, retiring at a normal age, you might get to make 40 or so vintages in your lifetime, unless of course you switch hemispheres in your winter and go to work somewhere else.   Wine is an expression of place; it's also an expression of a particular year. For the winegrower who also tends their own vines, there's a special significance to vintage time. From the time the vine buds, to the point where the flowering occurs, to the point where grapes begin developing, to the point of veraison when the skins soften and red grapes chance colour, to the point of deciding when to pick, the winegrower tracks the progress of vintage. That year is then something they try to capture in the wine, as the grapes enter the cellar. It's only after several months that they will really know the personality of the vintage they have just lived through, when the baby wines begin to show what they are about. Along the way, there are many things that can go wrong: frost, disease, pests, microbial disasters in the wine. It's a complicated business, but when it does well, it’s worth all the anxiety and toil.

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In Jo's glass

I was recently in South Africa for Cape Wine and managed to taste several vintages of the delicious Vin de Constance from Klein Constantia. I usually opt for a sweet wine at the end of a meal instead of a pudding and The Vin de Constance is a perfect way to end a meal. It's rich and opulent with stone fruits, vanilla and a hint of spice yet it is also fresh, balanced and has a long, moreish finish. Master of Wine, Tim Atkin, highly rated both the 2011 and 2012 in his most recent report on South Africa which is available to download for £15 on timatkin.com.  

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